Funny in farsi audio book

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    Written by Firoozeh Dumas, narrated by Firoozeh Dumas. Download and keep this book for Free with a 30 day Trial. In , when she was seven, Firoozeh Dumas and her family moved from Iran to Southern California, arriving with no firsthand knowledge of this country. ryaleomitsuvi.cf: Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America ( Audible Audio Edition): Firoozeh Dumas, Audible Studios: Books.

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    Pages:258
    Published (Last):04.03.2016
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    Funny In Farsi Audio Book

    Listen to Funny in Farsi Audiobook by Firoozeh Dumas, narrated by Firoozeh Dumas. "With a new final chapter"--Cover This work was originally published in hardcover in slightly different form by Villard Books in Leffingwell Elementary. Home»Reviews»FUNNY IN FARSI. Add to Favorites; facebook · twitter · mail The latest audiobook reviews, right in your inbox. Get our FREE Newsletter and.

    I first met Khaled at a fundraiser for the Berkeley public libraries in January Both of our books had been published fairly recently, but I had not yet read The Kite Runner. I did, however, remember his name. I was rooting for him without ever having read a word. Of course, once I read his book, I became an even bigger fan. Where do two Afghanis, one Iranian, and a Frenchman go for dinner?

    Sandberg, a few days before I started school. Since my mother and I did not speak English, the meeting consisted of a dialogue between my father and Mrs. My father carefully explained that I had attended a prestigious kindergarten where all the children were taught English.

    Eager to impress Mrs.

    Commentary: 'Funny in Farsi'

    Sandberg, he asked me to demonstrate my knowledge of the English language. I stood up straight and proudly recited all that I knew: "White, yellow, orange, red, purple, blue, green. He had decided that it would be a good idea for my mother to attend school with me for a few weeks. I could not understand why two people not speaking English would be better than one, but I was seven, and my opinion didn't matter much. Until my first day at Leffingwell Elementary School, I had never thought of my mother as an embarrassment, but the sight of all the kids in the school staring at us before the bell rang was enough to make me pretend I didn't know her.

    The bell finally rang and Mrs.

    Sandberg came and escorted us to class. Fortunately, she had figured out that we were precisely the kind of people who would need help finding the right classroom. My mother and I sat in the back while all the children took their assigned seats.

    Everyone continued to stare at us. Under my name, she wrote "I-R-A-N. My mom looked at me and asked me what she had said. I told her that the teacher probably wanted her to find Iran on the map. The problem was that my mother, like most women of her generation, had been only briefly educated.

    In her era, a girl's sole purpose in life was to find a husband. Having an education ranked far below more desirable attributes such as the ability to serve tea or prepare baklava. Before her marriage, my mother, Nazireh, had dreamed of becoming a midwife.

    Her father, a fairly progressive man, had even refused the two earlier suitors who had come for her so that his daughter could pursue her dream. My mother planned to obtain her diploma, then go to Tabriz to learn midwifery from a teacher whom my grandfather knew. Sadly, the teacher died unexpectedly, and my mother's dreams had to be buried as well.

    FUNNY IN FARSI by Firoozeh Dumas Read by Firoozeh Dumas | Audiobook Review | AudioFile Magazine

    Bachelor No. Like the other suitors, he had never spoken to my mother, but one of his cousins knew someone who knew my mother's sister, so that was enough. More important, my mother fit my father's physical requirements for a wife. Like most Iranians, my father preferred a fair-skinned woman with straight, light-colored hair.

    Having spent a year in America as a Fulbright scholar, he had returned with a photo of a woman he found attractive and asked his older sister, Sedigeh, to find someone who resembled her. Sedigeh had asked around, and that is how at age seventeen my mother officially gave up her dreams, married my father, and had a child by the end of the year.

    As the students continued staring at us, Mrs. Now, you can listen to this tale and learn a piece of Iranian tradition that you can share with your Persian friends. That said, even the casual listener will find the Shahnameh audiobook to be exciting from start to finish.

    Over nearly 42 hours, you will learn aspects of Iran that most college graduates never learn. From the different societal segments to how music and art affected the nation, this book gives you everything.

    This is essentially a university level course that you can enjoy whenever you want. Who would like this audiobook? If you are a student of history or want to understand the ideology of Iranian leaders, then you will love this book! If you just want to add some cultural understanding to your Farsi skills, we recommend one of the other Persian audiobooks on this list. We tried to get a list that covered both educational and entertaining topics. Leave a comment if you have a favorite audiobook!

    Funny in Farsi : a memoir of growing up Iranian in America

    Her father, an engineer, was the family pioneer who had been to this country before as a college student on a Fulbright Scholarship. He loved the country and wanted to come back and eventually he did, bringing his family with him. They found a welcome here, even though they learned that most Americans did not seem to know what or where Iran was and seemed to not have a clue as to how to pronounce the country's name. Honestly, what is so difficult about ear-rahn?

    One has to suspect that the mispronunciation is a deliberate insult. But perhaps it isn't. The ignorance of people can be truly astounding.

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